Get involved

What can you do?

  • Share PFAS articles and information on social media to educate your friends
  • Write Letters to the Editor to make sure this issue is getting the attention it needs in order to be addressed. 
  • Contact your elected officials and let them know you expect them to address the PFAS contamination issues in NC, including setting limits on PFAS discharges as a class of compounds.

Talking Points

  • Pollution should be stopped at its source.
  • Downstream communities should not have to pay the price and suffer the health consequences of avoidable pollution caused by upstream sources like wastewater treatment plants and industrial companies.
  • Wastewater treatment plants and companies that discharge PFAS or 1,4-dioxane must be required to warn downstream communities when they have discharged toxins into drinking water sources.
  • Regulators must hold wastewater treatment plants like Burlington responsible for sending toxins into our drinking water.
  • Polluters must be required to disclose what is in their waste, and install technology to clean up their pollution.
  • Our state regulators should be requiring dischargers to disclose what is in their waste, as mandated by the Clean Water Act, and controlling chemicals that are known to harm public health—like PFAS and 1,4-dioxane.
  • Industrial facilities should be removing toxic chemicals like PFAS and 1,4-dioxane from their waste before they send it to wastewater treatment plants that are not equipped to treat these chemicals.
  • Wastewater treatment plants cannot spray toxic sludge on fields that are next to rivers, streams, and drinking water. It has long been known that chemicals like PFAS run-off the fields into nearby waters.
  • Per- and polyfluoroalkyl compounds, or PFAS, are a class of chemicals that can cause serious illnesses.
  • 1,4-dioxane is used for a wide variety of industrial and manufacturing purposes. It causes liver and kidney damage, and likely causes cancer.

State regulators must hold wastewater treatment plants responsible for sending toxins into our drinking water – as mandated by the U.S. Clean Water Act

  •         Wastewater treatment plants and companies that discharge chemicals, such as PFAS or 1,4-dioxane, into surface waters used for drinking water must be required to warn downstream users about this threat to public health.
  •         Industries must be required to disclose what is in their waste, and install technology to remove toxic chemicals like PFAS and 1,4-dioxane, before they send it to municipal wastewater treatment plants that are not equipped to treat these chemicals.
  • The sludge from wastewater treatment plants containing chemicals like PFAS should not be spread on fields, where it can run off into nearby streams during storms.  These chemicals have been found in high quantities in streams adjacent to fields where Burlington sludge has been sprayed.